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Dublin: 14 °C Friday 20 July, 2018
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Rats could evolve to become 'bigger than sheep', scientists predict

If you’re terrified of rodents you may want to avert your eyes.

Image: Imgur

GIANT RATS MAY yet inherit the earth: That’s the rather unpleasant message being delivered by experts.

Dr Jan Zalasiewicz, a geologist at the University of Leicester, says that the rodents of the future may grow to be quite large because they’re very adaptable creatures.

The Deccan Chronicle reports that Zalasiewicz believes modern-day rats have the potential to grow to the size of sheep, or bigger, given the time and correct circumstances.

“Rats are one of the best examples of a species that we have helped spread around the world, and that have successfully adapted to many of the new environments that they found themselves in,” he said.

Given enough time, rats could probably grow to be at least as large as the capybara, the world’s largest rodent, that lives today, that can reach 80 kilos. If the ecospace was sufficiently empty, then they could get larger still.

You’ll have to excuse us for a second.

Source: Giphy

Luckily it won’t be happening for quite some time yet.

This isn’t the first we’ve heard of giant rats though: Back in 2012 there was quite the hullabaloo when Sky News reported that a two and half foot ‘Ratzilla’ was found on a housing estate in Bradford.

And just last year an English pensioner hit the headlines after killing what The Daily Mail described as a ‘giant rat’ on his farm in Consett, Co. Durham.

We’ve only got one thing to say to all of this.

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