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In pictures: whale shark displayed in Pakistan

Fishermen say that they found the 40-foot-long dead shark in the Arabian Sea near Karachi.

The whale shark carcass being lifted by crane in Karachi yesterday.
The whale shark carcass being lifted by crane in Karachi yesterday.
Image: AP Photo/PA Images

A 40-FOOT-LONG dead whale shark has gone on display in Karachi, Pakistan after being taken from the Arabian Sea nearby.

Hundreds of people gathered along the pier to watch the whale shark, so named because it is the largest of sharks, being hoisted onto the shore. Fishermen say they found the already-dead shark in the sea.

Dawn reports that a local man says he and his friends clubbed together to buy the huge fish for just over €1,600 to show their appreciation to the fishermen who caught it. Haji Qasim says he has permission to keep the fish on display for three days and then plans to sell the meat.

The World Wildlife Fund says that the species is listed as ‘vulnerable’ by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

In pictures: whale shark displayed in Pakistan
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    People surround a carcass of whale shark in Karachi, Pakistan yesterday. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil/PA Images)
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    Fishermen say they found the 40-foot whale dead near Karachi in the Arabian Sea. (AP Photo/PA Images)
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    People post for pictures by the shark's carcass in Karachi, Pakistan yesterday. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil/PA Images)

Although sightings of the whale shark in the wild are extremely rare, Australia is one of the best places to spot it. The species is also listed as ‘vulnerable’ on Australia’s Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

The sharks feed primarily on fish eggs, plankton and squid, and are not aggressive despite having around 3,000 teeth. In this clip, National Geographic (somewhat excitedly) describes how the whale shark feasts with its near-useless teeth:
[embed id="embed_1"]
(Video via NationalGeographic)

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