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Dublin: 3 °C Tuesday 18 February, 2020

#Iceland

From TheJournal.ie Iceland’s finance minister: 'Ireland shouldn’t copy our formula for default' Default

Iceland’s finance minister: 'Ireland shouldn’t copy our formula for default'

Ireland and Greece can’t follow the recovery mode as Iceland did, finance minister Steingrimur Sigfusson insists.

From TheJournal.ie Flight restrictions across Europe lifted as the ash cloud threat abates Ash Cloud

Flight restrictions across Europe lifted as the ash cloud threat abates

Passengers breathe a sigh of relief as the skies look clear for the next 36 hours at least. Ryanair, Aer Lingus and all the major carriers are operating normal schedules.

From TheJournal.ie German airports reopen as ash cloud dissipates Ash Cloud

German airports reopen as ash cloud dissipates

Air traffic has resumed over Germany after the threat from volcanic ash forced airlines to cancel flights earlier today. Meanwhile, the Irish Aviation Authority says there will be no impact on Irish airspace for at least the next 48 hours.

From TheJournal.ie Air travel relief as Grimsvotn volcano stops erupting Ash Cloud

Air travel relief as Grimsvotn volcano stops erupting

The volcano causing air travel difficulties across Europe stopped eruptions this morning, says Iceland’s Met Office.

From TheJournal.ie Ryanair’s test flight claims disputed by experts Ryanair

Ryanair’s test flight claims disputed by experts

The airline said that it safely flew a test plane through a ‘red zone’ for volcanic ash yesterday and incurred no damage – however experts have said the plane never entered a danger zone.

From TheJournal.ie No Irish closures - for now - as Ash Cloud reaches Europe Ash Cloud

No Irish closures - for now - as Ash Cloud reaches Europe

As Grimsvotn’s eruption begins to wane, airspace closures on continental Europe will still mean some cancelled flights.

From TheJournal.ie IAA on ash cloud: No restrictions on Irish airspace for at least next 24 hours Ash Cloud

IAA on ash cloud: No restrictions on Irish airspace for at least next 24 hours

Eurocontrol says that about 500 European flights were cancelled today as a result of the ash cloud, but disruptions to flights in UK air space are expected to have ended by tomorrow.

From TheJournal.ie The Daily Fix: Tuesday Daily Fix This post contains images

The Daily Fix: Tuesday

All the news of the day you might have missed…

From TheJournal.ie Take 5: Tuesday Take 5

Take 5: Tuesday

5 stories, 5 minutes, 5 o’clock.

From TheJournal.ie Irish airports remain open but ash cloud disrupts flights to Scotland Volcano

Irish airports remain open but ash cloud disrupts flights to Scotland

Ryanair has expressed its displeasure with the disruption, believing it to be unnecessary. The IAA has said that all Irish airports remain open and added that it will update the situation later today.

From TheJournal.ie Aer Lingus cancels Scottish flights as volcanic ash cloud moves closer Volcano

Aer Lingus cancels Scottish flights as volcanic ash cloud moves closer

President Obama won’t be the only one inconvenienced by ash from the Grimsvotn volcano, however IAA says it still doesn’t expect any disruptions to air travel in Irish space in the next 24 hours.

From TheJournal.ie Take 5: Monday Take 5

Take 5: Monday

5 minutes, 5 stories, 5 o’clock.

From TheJournal.ie EU confirms that volcanic ash cloud is heading in Ireland's direction Ash Cloud This post contains videos

EU confirms that volcanic ash cloud is heading in Ireland's direction

Met Éireann says it is monitoring the situation, but the IAA is not expecting any disruptions to flights in Irish air space over the next 24 hours. The EU has confirmed that the ash looks likely to enter British and Irish airspace shortly.

From TheJournal.ie The Daily Fix: Sunday Daily Fix This post contains images

The Daily Fix: Sunday

All the news of the day you might have missed…

From TheJournal.ie Iceland closes main airport but ash cloud 'not heading to Europe' Volcanic Eruption

Iceland closes main airport but ash cloud 'not heading to Europe'

Keflavik airport is fully closed with no flights taking off or landing as the ash plume covers Iceland but officials insist its not Europe-bound.

From TheJournal.ie Another Icelandic volcano erupts - but it's unlikely to cause travel disruption Volcanic Eruption

Another Icelandic volcano erupts - but it's unlikely to cause travel disruption

History shows that previous eruptions in Grimsvotn have not had much influence on flight traffic — unlike the massive disruption caused last year by Eyjafjallajokull.

From TheJournal.ie Take 5: Tuesday Take 5

Take 5: Tuesday

5 minutes, 5 stories, 5 o’clock.

From TheJournal.ie Report vindicates aviation authorities over ash cloud flight cancellations Ash Cloud This post contains videos

Report vindicates aviation authorities over ash cloud flight cancellations

The ash cloud from Iceland’s (still unpronounceable) Eyjafjallajökull volcano could have caused engines to fail and seriously scratched up windows.

From TheJournal.ie The Daily Fix: Sunday Daily Fix

The Daily Fix: Sunday

In todays Fix: Poland remembers the victims of last year’s plane crash in western Russia; an Oxford academic cancels his book launch in NUI Maynooth over Lucinda Creighton’s “anti-Turkish and anti-gay” comments; and we hear Obama’s first campaign song. Maybe.

From TheJournal.ie British and Dutch governments to sue Iceland over lost billions Iceland

British and Dutch governments to sue Iceland over lost billions

The British and Dutch governments are preparing to sue Iceland after the country’s electorate rejected a second proposal to repay billions of euro of lost deposits.

From TheJournal.ie Icelanders reject plan to repay bank debt to the UK and the Netherlands Iceland

Icelanders reject plan to repay bank debt to the UK and the Netherlands

The country had been voting on proposal to repay €4 billion lost as a result a bank collapse.

From TheJournal.ie The 9 at 9: Sunday 9 At 9

The 9 at 9: Sunday

Nine things you need to know by 9am: It’s census day today so every household must fill out their forms; Barack Obama could be set to line out at Croke Park; a new poll finds support for the coalition; and Gay Byrne will be back on our screens every Friday.

From TheJournal.ie The Daily Fix: Saturday Daily Fix

The Daily Fix: Saturday

A round-up of the day’s events.

From TheJournal.ie Iceland goes to the polls over whether or not to pay back loans Iceland

Iceland goes to the polls over whether or not to pay back loans

Voters are deciding on whether or not to approve a deal to repay Britain and the Netherlands money owed from the collapse of an online bank in 2008.

From TheJournal.ie Iceland to hold referendum over bank debt repayment deal Iceland

Iceland to hold referendum over bank debt repayment deal

Iceland had to borrow money from Britain and the Netherlands after Landsbanki collapsed – now it’ll vote on repayment.

From TheJournal.ie Ireland and Iceland join forces at debut Northern Lights Observatory event Ireland To Iceland

Ireland and Iceland join forces at debut Northern Lights Observatory event

Member of Icelandic Ministry for Ideas and Mayor of Reykjavik among invited guests for special collaboratory night.

From TheJournal.ie Iceland rises again as Ireland sinks Economy

Iceland rises again as Ireland sinks

Icelanders argue that its tough approach has saved it from the generation of hardship some predict for Ireland.

From TheJournal.ie The bluffer's guide to... Vatnajokull and Grimsvotn Volcano This post contains images

The bluffer's guide to... Vatnajokull and Grimsvotn

Everything you need to know about Iceland’s latest volatile volcanic area.

OFFICIALS ON VOLCANIC watch in Iceland have said that meltwater is flooding from a glacial lake there – this could indicated that the volcano underneath is about to erupt.

Reuters is reporting that Iceland’s Civil Protection Department spokeswoman Gudrun Johannesdottir says water is pouring from Iceland’s biggest glacier, Vatnajokull. It lies about 100km from Eyjafjallajokull, the volcano which erupted in April, grounding thousands of flights across Europe because of fears of volcanic ash interfering with airplane engine systems.

Vatnajokull glacier lies on a number of volcanic “hotspots” and the Civil Protection Department fears that the floodwater could signal an increase in geological activity below the surface.

From TheJournal.ie Fresh protests outside Icelandic parliament Wouldn't Happen Here

Fresh protests outside Icelandic parliament

Further protests in front of Icelandic parliament, PM and wife of president pelted with eggs.

From TheJournal.ie Iceland votes to refer ex-PM to special court over financial crisis Iceland

Iceland votes to refer ex-PM to special court over financial crisis

Geir Haarde may be the first world leader to stand trial over the global financial crisis.

From TheJournal.ie Why The Irish Debt Crisis Could Be Worse Than Spain, England, And Even Iceland Irish Economy

Why The Irish Debt Crisis Could Be Worse Than Spain, England, And Even Iceland

Some quick thoughts on what is happening in Ireland.

From TheJournal.ie Iceland could prosecute former cabinet over banking crisis Iceland

Iceland could prosecute former cabinet over banking crisis

A special investigation into the collapse of the country’s biggest banks concludes: the government’s negligence was criminal.

ICELAND HAS begun talks with the European Union concerning its possible accession.

Belgium’s foreign minister and President-in-office of the Council, Steven Vanackere, said that it is “confident that Iceland has the capacity, has the determination and the commitment” to become a member of the European Union.

However he added that serious efforts will be required on Iceland’s part before the country will meet accession criteria – particularly in the areas of fisheries, agriculture, rural development, environment, free movement of capital and financial services.

Issues like whale hunting and the collapse of Icelandic bank Icesave are likely to be the most difficult points of negotiations.

Fisheries

Up until relatively recently, Iceland was a rural nation. Industries like agriculture and fisheries are still closely guarded, local enterprises. However, this does mean that food prices are expensive which is one reason for potential domestic support for EU accession.

From Ireland’s point of view, Iceland’s fishing industry is a significant issue. Irish fishermen particularly depend on mackerel fishing as a source of income but their quota is about half that of Iceland’s (which has a population of just 308,910), which Ireland complains is unfair.

Following failed talks on the issue in early 2010, the Irish Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Sean Connick, wrote to the European Commission to complain that Iceland’s fishing habits threaten mackerel stock and encourage the Faroe islands to overfish.

Financial services

The Icelandic bank Icesaver failed in the wake global financial crisis, resulting in many British and Dutch investors losing their deposits. Reykjavik has been found to be legally responsible for the loss by European trade authority and ordered to pay back €3.8bn, which is – unsurprisingly – extremely unpopular with Icelandic voters.

Iceland has been told that it will not be able to enter the EU without resolving the issue.

The Icelandic whaling industry is also a point of contention. Iceland’s application will not be likely to be accepted unless they stop hunting whales.

Domestic opposition

Despite Iceland’s Minister for Foreign Affairs, Össur Skarphédinsson, stating: “Our home is Europe and Iceland’s EU membership will certainly serve our mutual interests,” Icelandic domestic support for the EU bid is failing.

Public opposition to EU accession has risen to about 60% from about 54 % in November 2009, according to the Financial Times.

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