Advertisement
This site uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. By continuing to browse, you agree to the use of cookies described in our Cookies Policy. You may change your settings at any time but this may impact on the functionality of the site. To learn more see our Cookies Policy.
OK
Dublin: 6 °C Monday 9 December, 2019

#Vampires

From TheJournal.ie The making of Dracula: How Bram Stoker's 'in-betweener' status inspired horror Dracula Does Dublin

The making of Dracula: How Bram Stoker's 'in-betweener' status inspired horror

Being a middle-class Anglican in Victorian Dublin helped Stoker create one of literature’s most monstrous characters.

From TheJournal.ie No one on Tinder into UFOs or ghosts? Try this supernatural dating website Ghouls This post contains a poll

'Coffin bed' has hilariously mixed Amazon reviews

Customers just can’t agree on it for some reason.

Production company sues Twilight films for being "racist and perverted"

The relationship between a 17-year-old girl and a 100-year-old vampire doesn’t sit well with them.

7 epic Irish action movies you've probably never heard of Yippee-ki-diddly-aye This post contains videos

7 epic Irish action movies you've probably never heard of

And (mostly) for good reason.

From TheJournal.ie The Daily Fix: Monday Daily Fix This post contains videos

The Daily Fix: Monday

All the day’s big stories, plus any bits and pieces you may have missed…

OVER 500 PEOPLE have been attacked by a colony of rabid vampire bats in Peru’s Amazon. At least  four children died as a result of contracting rabies in the attacks.

Medial supplies have been sent to the village of Urakusa, in the north-east of Peru, to the Aguajun tribe. Peru’s government has dispatched emergency teams to battle the rabies outbreak.

Vampire bats feed on the blood of mammals while they sleep, but generally feed on livestock and wildlife. Experts have suggested that deforestation of the bats’ natural habitat has forced them to turn to humans for food.

Last year, National Geographic reported that the bats were increasingly biting people and have caused rabies outbreaks in Peru before.

This extract from a National Geographic documentary shows the bats feeding on a sleeping pig (not for the faint-hearted):

Rabies, according to the World Health Organisation, kills more than 55,000 people each year. The first symptoms of infection include fever, fatigue and headaches. The illness then spreads to the respiratory system and the nervous system. Death occurs within seven days without medical treatment.