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Dublin: 16 °C Wednesday 21 August, 2019

#Words

The 11 most perfect collective nouns for animals

Who comes up with these?

From TheJournal.ie Column: What does ‘feck’ really mean? Read Me

Column: What does ‘feck’ really mean?

It’s practically our national swearword – but what do we mean when we say ‘feck’? And where did it come from? Stan Carey explains. (Contains strong language)

7 words we should definitely have in English... Logophile This post contains images

7 words we should definitely have in English...

.. but don’t.

From TheJournal.ie My favourite speech: Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Leo Varadkar Famous Words This post contains videos

My favourite speech: Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Leo Varadkar

Continuing our summer series on TheJournal.ie of public figures’ favourite speeches, Leo Varadkar picks one of the most famous speeches ever made by a US president.

From TheJournal.ie My favourite speech: CEO of The Jack and Jill Foundation Jonathan Irwin Famous Words

My favourite speech: CEO of The Jack and Jill Foundation Jonathan Irwin

Continuing our summer series on TheJournal.ie of public figures’ favourite speeches, Jonathan Irwin picks a speech by a former Senator who was influential during the Northern Ireland peace process.

From TheJournal.ie My favourite speech: Fergus Finlay Famous Words

My favourite speech: Fergus Finlay

Continuing our summer series on TheJournal.ie of public figures’ favourite speeches, Fergus Finlay picks a speech by one of Ireland’s most famous trade union leaders.

From TheJournal.ie My favourite speech: Mary Lou McDonald Famous Words

My favourite speech: Mary Lou McDonald

Continuing our summer series on TheJournal.ie of public figures’ favourite speeches, the Sinn Féin vice president picks an address by Ireland’s most famous female revolutionary nationalist.

From TheJournal.ie My favourite speech: Terry Prone Famous Words

My favourite speech: Terry Prone

Continuing a summer series on TheJournal.ie of public figures’ favourite speeches, Terry Prone picks a stirring address from General George Patton.

From TheJournal.ie My favourite speech: Declan Ganley Famous Words This post contains videos

My favourite speech: Declan Ganley

Continuing a summer series on TheJournal.ie of public figures’ favourite speeches, Declan Ganley picks a stirring speech made by Winston Churchill in 1940.

5 everyday words that are actually a little bit racist Bad Language This post contains images

5 everyday words that are actually a little bit racist

Have you accidentally been using racial slurs? Probably.

Say what? 7 common expressions and their origins Idioms This post contains images

Say what? 7 common expressions and their origins

I like the cut of your jib – let’s bury the hatchet.

13 words you'll never hear outside of Ireland... Hiberno-english This post contains images

13 words you'll never hear outside of Ireland...

…unless they are being spoken by an Irish ex-pat, of course.

From TheJournal.ie ABC - where the 'B' doesn't just stand for 'broadcasting' The B Word

ABC - where the 'B' doesn't just stand for 'broadcasting'

Some media experts say the abbreviation for ‘bitch’ may be satirical and reclaiming the word – but some feel it is polarising and an attention-grabbing move.

Amazing! University releases list of 'banished words'

‘Baby bump’, ‘ginormous’ and ‘thank you in advance’ were all on the list of terms that make people’s blood boil.

The words that most annoyed YOU in 2011

We asked our readers what words or phrases, like, literally absolutely drove them nuts at the end of the day. They certainly told us.

From The42 Alan Hansen apologises for Match of the Day 'coloured' gaffe Facepalm This post contains videos

Alan Hansen apologises for Match of the Day 'coloured' gaffe

The pundit said that he “deeply regrets” his poor choice of words during last night’s Match of the Day.

From TheJournal.ie The Daily Fix: Saturday Daily Fix This post contains videos

The Daily Fix: Saturday

In tonight’s Fix: Government support nosedives in new poll; the truth about Christmas shopping; and the year’s most annoying words…

The most annoying words in 2011? Yeah, whatever.

The Marist poll in the US fills us in on the most grating conversation, er, fillers. What are your most hated words of 2011?

IT WAS the sound that dominated the world cup but only last year many of us had no idea what a vuvuzela was.

Now the word, along with 2,000 others has made it into the third edition Oxford Dictionary of English, which is published today.

Other new words to make it in the dictionary include cheeseball (something that lacks taste or style) and turducken – a roast dish that consists of chicken inside a duck inside a turkey.

The internet has coined quite a few words with paywall, microblogging, netbook and biral have all been added to the dictionary in recent years. The financial crisis has also thrown up a few previously unheard of words. Toxic debt, deleveraging (reducing debt by quickly selling assets), quantitative easing and staycation are now in common parlance.

Oxford adds words based on their usage and it is the first dictionary to do so.

Last week some of the words that didn’t make the cut were revealed. Words such as wurfing (searching the net while as work) and earworm (a catchy tune that frequently gets stuck in your head)

Other new entries are :

  • wardrobe malfunction : when someone exposes an intimate part of their body after clothing slips;
  • chill pill: a notional pill to make someone calm;
  • bromance : a close but non-sexual relationship between two men;
  • LBD (little black dress). This refers to the simple evening or cocktail dress that, it is claimed, should be part of every womans wardrobe; and
  • frenemy : a person that one is friendly with despite a fundamental dislike.