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Dublin: 4 °C Monday 17 February, 2020

#Supernova

From The42 Siofra Cleirigh-Buttner takes brilliant silver, sets new Irish record at NCAA indoor championships Supernova

Siofra Cleirigh-Buttner takes brilliant silver, sets new Irish record at NCAA indoor championships

The 22-year-old ran a confident 800 metres to post 2:02.46 in the highly-competitive US collegiate meet.

From TheJournal.ie 5 incredible supernovas captured in space (and how you could spot one too) Amateur Astronomer
From TheJournal.ie Irish man discovers a third supernova - with telescope he built himself Stargazer

Irish man discovers a third supernova - with telescope he built himself

Dave Grennan has an observatory in his back garden in Raheny – and celebrated this latest discovery with a “nice strong cup of tea”.

From TheJournal.ie "I nearly fell off my chair": Dublin man makes second supernova discovery Astronomy

"I nearly fell off my chair": Dublin man makes second supernova discovery

Amateur astronomer Dave Grennan has been called Ireland’s ‘premier supernova hunter’ after discovering two supernovae in just two years.

Astronomy Ireland lecture asks: what happens when the Sun dies? End Of The World This post contains videos

Astronomy Ireland lecture asks: what happens when the Sun dies?

Longing for a lecture on how your home planet is going to be consumed by a fiery ball of apocalyptic hell? Well, you’re in luck…

ASTONOMERS HAVE, for the very first time, obtained a three dimensional view of an exploding star.

Scientists at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) used the aptly-named Very Large Telescope to make a 3D map of the distribution of the innermost material thrown out by a recently exploded star, positioned 165,000 light-years away from Earth.

The star is known as Supernova 1987A.

The results of new research show that the star was extremely turbulent and the eventual blast intensely powerful – unlike, scientists say, the Earth’s sun.

When our sun dies, it is expected to do so with a (relative) lack of fanfare.

Supernova 1987A exploded in 1987, and the was first in nearly four centuries that was possible to be observed with the naked-eye due to its relative closeness.

The position of Supernova 1987A has also made it possible for astronomers to study the aftermath of such an explosion in greater detail than ever before, making it a truly exciting event for astronomers.

The study shows that instead  of exploding in all directions, the supernova had a preferred direction.