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Dublin: 14 °C Friday 23 August, 2019

#Trapped Miners

From TheJournal.ie 28 miners rescued after underground ordeal Rescue

28 miners rescued after underground ordeal

The gold miners had been trapped in underground chambers after a fire in the New Zealand mine.

From TheJournal.ie At least 21 killed in gas explosion at Chinese mine China

At least 21 killed in gas explosion at Chinese mine

A gas leaks sparks an underground explosion at a mine in the Yunnan province, with around two dozen more miners trapped.

From TheJournal.ie Fourth and final body found at Welsh mine Trapped Miners

Fourth and final body found at Welsh mine

Police in Wales have confirmed that the bodies of four miners missing since Thursday have been found and recovered.

From TheJournal.ie Take 5: Friday Take 5

Take 5: Friday

5 stories, 5 minutes, 5 o’clock…

From TheJournal.ie The 9 at 9: Friday 9 At 9 This post contains videos

The 9 at 9: Friday

Nine things you need to know including: The latest Eurozone debt crisis talks with one special guest, another eventful day in the presidential race and meet the latest YouTube sensations.

Chilean copper miners' drama set for silver screen

The story of the 33 Chilean miners trapped for ten weeks last year is to be made into a major Hollywood movie.

From TheJournal.ie Chilean mine collapse report blames owners Chilean Miners

Chilean mine collapse report blames owners

The mining accident which trapped 33 men below ground for 72 days has been blamed on poor regulation and inadequate safety measures.

From TheJournal.ie The 9 at 9: Sunday 9 At 9

The 9 at 9: Sunday

Nine things you really need to know by 9am: The possible size of Ireland’s rescue package; The human price of high-street fashion; and the Pope announces that condoms are ok in ‘certain circumstances’… but we bet you can’t guess when!

From TheJournal.ie Rescue of New Zealand miners delayed over second explosion fear New Zealand

Rescue of New Zealand miners delayed over second explosion fear

Authorities in New Zealand have been forced to put rescue efforts on hold as they test the air-quality underground.

From TheJournal.ie The 9 at 9: Saturday 9 At 9

The 9 at 9: Saturday

Crisis talks continue between Ireland, the IMF, EU and ECB; The High Court will decide if a HIV positive mother should be forced to give her child anti retro-viral drugs at birth; and New Zealand waits for some signal from 29 trapped miners.

From TheJournal.ie In pictures: the Chilean rescue, as it unfolded The Great Escape This post contains images

In pictures: the Chilean rescue, as it unfolded

The world feared they were dead – and will never forget how they lived. Relive the rescue in pictures.

From TheJournal.ie Timeline of a truly great escape The Great Escape This post contains videos

Timeline of a truly great escape

One by one, the stepped into the light. A minute-by-minute account of the how the rescue unfolded.

From TheJournal.ie Seeing the light: 33 miners freed after ten-week torture The Great Escape

Seeing the light: 33 miners freed after ten-week torture

They scheduled 48 hours: it took only 25 to release the 33 miners and the six rescuers who went to help them.

From TheJournal.ie Haircuts and heels: Miners' wives race to look their best

Haircuts and heels: Miners' wives race to look their best

As the countdown to the rescue of 33 miners begins in Chile, the men’s partners start their own preparations…

From TheJournal.ie Chile: what happens next? Chilean Miners

Chile: what happens next?

The countdown to the rescue of the Chilean miners is finally underway. Here’s how the next 48 hours are likely to play out.

From TheJournal.ie Drill pierces roof of Chilean mine Trapped Miners

Drill pierces roof of Chilean mine

Drill breaks through room of workshop 624m underground, meaning a rescue could be imminent.

From TheJournal.ie Rescue teams hope to rescue Chilean miners tomorrow Chile

Rescue teams hope to rescue Chilean miners tomorrow

A giant diamond-tipped drill is now just 40m away from the trapped men – but there’s new safety concerns.

From TheJournal.ie First baby born to trapped Chilean miner Trapped Miners This post contains videos

First baby born to trapped Chilean miner

Some good news for miners trapped underground for 40 days.

From TheJournal.ie Will you be mine?: Sending his love up the well Chile

Will you be mine?: Sending his love up the well

The Chilean miners speak to their loved ones for the first time – and one proposes.

CHILEAN AUTHORITIES HAVE released video footage of the 33 miners trapped in a mine for three weeks.

The miners sang the national anthem, joked with one another, and recorded messages for their families above them.

The video helped to relieve the fears of those waiting above ground when it was shown to them last night.

The miners recorded the following video for their friends and families waiting for their rescue:

Some of the miners give a tour of the makeshift refuge the 33 are crammed into:

We’ve organized everything really well down here,” one of the miners said, pointing to a corner reserved for medical supplies.

This is where we entertain ourselves, where we have a meeting every day, where we make plans. This is where we pray.

Authorities have warned the miners that it could take up to four months to rescue them, as they must drill a tunnel 688m deep, and wide enough for the men to pass through.

Families have been asked to stay positive in their communications to the miners, and Chilean authorities have asked NASA for advice on how best to keep the men in good mental health through their time in the mine.

Former astronaut Jerry Linenger, who was trapped on board the Mir space station for three months, said the most important thing was to be completely honest with the miners about the time involved in the rescue.

The family of one of the trapped men said it will sue the company which owns the mine, alleging the company was negligent in re-opening the mine after it was closed in 2007 following an accident. Chile’s mining service is also named on the lawsuit.

This ITN video contains English translations of some of the messages:

AUTHORITIES IN SANTIAGO, CHILE have contacted NASA seeking their advice on how to keep the 33 trapped miners amused while the painstaking excavation process to get them back to the surface begins.

The 33 miners (pictured) were feared dead until they managed to send a message to the surface confirming that they were all alive and well, despite being trapped 688m below earth since a cave-in three weeks ago.

But now – with it being a potential four months before the men could see the full light of day – NASA and the country’s submarine crews are being consulted on how to keep the men amused.

“Psychologically speaking we have to try to keep them on the right track and not give them false hope that it will be a short rescue,” said the country’s mining minister Laurence Golborne.

Golborne’s attitude is backed up by former astronaut Jerry Linenger. “The biggest mistake you could make right now is over-promising.”

Linenger, who was aboard the Mir space station where there was a fire on board in 1997, said: “In my case, knowing that the space shuttle was coming in three months was enough. Psychologically, you need to know the end point.

“The key is to not say it’s going to take two months when it’s going to take four. You can adjust yourself to the long haul as long as you don’t have to make the adjustment twice. You only have so much reserve.”

The government intends to send the trapped men some playing cards, board games and dominoes to help them pass the time, and will send down some lighting which will mimic the sensations of night and day.

THE FAMILIES OF TRAPPED chilean miners have been asked to keep their letters to the trapped men optimistic, and not to dwell on the length of time a rescue may take.

On Sunday, the 33 men passed a message from their refuge to the surface saying they were safe and well, despite being trapped below ground for 17 days after a tunnel collapse at the main entrance on 5 August.

Competitive games have been ruled out as a means of keeping the men occupied while the rescue attempt rolls on, as psychologists say it’s important for the group to function as one unit.

Chile’s health minister Jaime Manalich said yesterday that it was important to keep the men informed of the rescue process and the weeks it may take, but experts have asked the families of the miners to stay upbeat in their communications.

Microphones allowing doctors and psychologists to speak to the men and keep them in stable conditions will be passed into the mine.

The men said they have been surviving on mouthfuls of tuna and milk since their confinement.

Rescuers began passing packages containing food, water, and medical supplies down to the trapped men yesterday, and plan to start including letters from relatives in the survival packages.

Lilianett Ramirez, wife of one of the miners, said yesterday:

Can you imagine? After 30 years of marriage we will start sending each other love letters again.

CHILEAN MINERS TRAPPED for over two weeks in a mine have sent a message to the surface saying they are still alive. The message reads in English: “We are well inside the shelter.”

The miners have been trapped underground since the collapse of the main access route on 5 August.

They attached the hand-written note to a drill which rescuers were probing the mine with.

But, it could take months to reach the men who are trapped about 700m (2,300 feet) underground.

Chilean president Sebastian Pinera visited the mine yesterday and said that all efforts would be made to rescue the men:

It will take months to get them out. It will take time, but it doesn’t matter how long it takes, to have a happy ending.

Food, water, and medical supplies will be passed into the mine to the men, but they face serious psychological challenges if it takes the time estimated to get them out.