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Eh, some MUAs are pretending to have vitiligo for the Bratz Challenge

Truly the weirdest of flexes.

MAKEUP ENTHUSIASTS AND ‘Gram-A-Holics alike will be familar with the #BratzChallenge. All over the world, people have been attempting to paint their faces to look like Barbie’s bratty cousin.

Dxj635DVAAI4TSg Source: @xoShaaan/Twitter

However, some MUAs have been criticised for taking it too far, by recreating looks based on dolls with vitiligo, when they don’t have the condition themselves. 

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Source: Damian Stylez/Instagram

Vitiligo is a skin condition characterised by patches of the skin losing their pigment. The patches of skin usually turn white and form sharp margins. Model Winnie Harlow has brought vitiligo to the forefront through her work and activism. 

2018 Victoria's Secret Fashion Show - New York Source: SIPA USA/PA Images

The ‘America’s Next Top Model’ previously said she’s “very sick” of talking about her skin and that the emotional and physical effects of vitiligo aren’t as deep as the media seems to make them.

And while Harlow’s been quick to pull up newspapers who refer to her as a “sufferer”, it’s still undeniably dodge of makeup influencers to use the condition in an attempt to get more attention.

Lauren Elyse, a MUA with vitiligo, outlined her issue with this particular interpretation with the challenge on Twitter.

View this post on Instagram

S E L F • L O V E ——————————————————— Since I’m doing a series of Valentine’s Day looks, I thought I’d do a look and talk about self-love. For those of you who don’t know, I was diagnosed with vitiligo around 5 or 6 years old, with the spots on my face developing when I was about 20. I was so embarrassed by them that I rarely left the house without covering them with makeup. It took some time for me to feel ok with them and posting on here helped. However, social media had pressured me into thinking that the only way I could boost my following and further my career as a makeup artist was to cover my spots and look like every other ‘IG baddie.’ Eventually, I got tired of looking like that, it wasn’t me and so I stopped covering them in my looks. I constantly struggle with loving myself- I have issues with my body and my personality, thinking I’m either too much or not enough. But, I’ve definitely grown to love this part of me, and I can’t imagine myself looking any other way. Lately, I’ve been seeing more and more people create vitiligo spots with makeup for “looks” and it makes me deeply uncomfortable. When I was covering my vitiligo, people would say that I was insecure and how I must hate myself. Now that I don’t, people call me an attention-seeker, that I should cover it up along with other nasty comments. These people who mimic skin conditions get praise for being “creative” and “artistic” and “unique” while those of us who actually have it are still being disrespected and harassed by people. I understand that their intentions are good, but we do not need people who don’t have it to tell us how beautiful we are- we have each other for that. We have people like @yvesmark.chery @sadistitt @barbarhat and (the inspiration for this look) @radiantbambi and so many other people with vitiligo to show how beautiful, dope and unique we are. I still have a long way to go in my self-love journey, but I’m glad that I love my vitiligo as much as I do now. And I’m so honored whenever anyone of you with vitiligo shares your story with me and tell me how I’ve helped you feel more comfortable and confident in yourselves 🖤

A post shared by Lauren Elyse (@laur_elyse) on

“I’m really fucking tired of this shit,” she tweeted initially. “I don’t need someone who doesn’t have it to “celebrate” it or “raise awareness”.

There are plenty of us out there who are doing that who are barely seen, yet people who decide to mimic it are. It’s not even about what we went through growing up, but also what we experience NOW.”

Opening up on her Instagram, she continued: “These people who mimic skin conditions get praise for being ‘creative’ and ‘artistic’ and ‘unique’ while those of us who actually have it are still being disrespected and harassed by people.

I understand that their intentions are good, but we do not need people who don’t have it to tell us how beautiful we are – we have each other for that.”

In summary, this isn’t ‘blackface’ levels of ignorance, but rather a misguided attempt to shine a light on beauty standards within a saturated industry. Instead of taking features of those less represented to use on your own platform, maybe just … Share your platform with the under represented?

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