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Junior Mastermind: The answers

How did you do?

Image: TV3

WELL, HOW DID you do?

Here are the answers:

  1. In which city was the doomed liner the Titanic built? Belfast
  2. In the year 2000 which American golfer became the youngest person ever to complete a career grand slam by winning all four major championships? Tiger Woods
  3. In 1966 the band The Beatles had a global hit with a song about which type of yellow sea craft? Submarine
  4. An insect usually has one or two pairs of wings and how many legs? Six
  5. The literary and movie characters of Peter Pan and Captain Hook are associated with which mythical land? Never-never Land
  6. Which former German political party came to power in 1933? Nazi Party/National Socialist Party
  7. Daniel Fahrenheit devised a scale used for measuring what? Temperature
  8. Ban Ki Moon, Boutros Boutros-Ghali and Kofi Annan have all been appointed secretaries general of which international organisation? The United Nations
  9. In which fictional city might you meet the villains The Joker, The Penguin and Catwoman? Gotham City
  10. Which American cyclist has won the Tour de France seven times? Lance Armstrong (although he has now been stripped of his titles)
  11. In which Mediterranean country are the ruins of the ancient city of Troy situated? Turkey
  12. In 1941 the United States entered World War Two when the Japanese attacked which United States naval base? Pearl Harbour
  13. In Robert Louis Stephenson’s classic story, upon drinking a potion, into whom does Doctor Jekyll transform? Mr Hyde
  14. The 2010 Winter Olympics were held in which Canadian city? Vancouver
  15. In 1993 Dawson Stelfox became the first Irishman to climb the world’s highest mountain. What is the name of the peak? Mount Everest
  16. The Inuit peoples of Alaska, Northern Canada, Greenland and Siberia are more commonly known as what? Eskimos
  17. Connemara, Shetland and Welsh are all varieties of which animal? Pony
  18. What was the name of the world’s most powerful rocket that NASA built to launch the Apollo missions to the Moon? Saturn V
  19. In Irish folklore, what job does a leprechaun usually do? Shoemaking
  20. Which inventor made a series of remarkable inventions related to the telegraph, telephone, phonograph and the incandescent light bulb in the late 1800s? Thomas Edison
  21. Which classic property boardgame celebrated its seventy-fifth birthday in 2010? Monopoly
  22. ‘The Parr family, Bob, Helen, Violet and Dash, all feature in which 2004 animated movie? The Incredibles
  23. What did the Montgolfier brothers invent that was first flown in 1783 in Paris? The hot air balloon
  24. According to the traditional nursery rhyme, little boys are made of “slugs and snails and puppy dog tails”, what are little girls made of? Sugar and spice and all things nice
  25. Which country did the Romans call ‘Hibernia’? Ireland
  26. The German brothers Jakob and Wilhelm were famous for their classic collections of fairy tales. What was their surname? Grimm
  27. In which sport do the American sisters Serena and Venus Williams compete? Tennis
  28. What is the name given to the bones in the human body which protect internal organs including lungs and the heart? Ribs
  29. What sleek, oceanic predator has species named the bull, tiger and leopard? Shark
  30. Which German racing-car driver currently holds the record for winning the most Formula One Drivers’ Championships? Michael Schumacher
  31. Which legendary British king wielded the magic sword Excalibur? Arthur
  32. What is the name of the optical instrument used by a submerged submarine to view above the water? Periscope
  33. What is unusual about the domestic breed of cat known as the Manx Cat? No tail
  34. Which historical Japanese warriors followed Bushido, their unwritten code of honour? Samurai
  35. Paul Hewson is the real name of which member of the Irish rock band U2? Bono
  36. In which capital city do you find Lenin’s Mausoleum, Red Square and the Kremlin? Moscow
  37. What famous train and his friends would you find on the fictional island of Sodor? Thomas the Tank Engine
  38. What is the name given to the remains or impression of a prehistoric plant or animal that is embedded in rock and preserved in petrified form? Fossil
  39. In Walt Disney’s 1967 movie “The Jungle Book”, which was loosely based on Rudyard Kipling’s short stories of the same name, what type of animal is Bagheera? Panther
  40. Opthamology is a medical specialty dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of which body part? Eye
  41. Which Scottish scientist discovered Penicillin? Alexander Fleming
  42. You would be greeted by the native phrase “Aloha” on which Pacific Islands? Hawaii
  43. What type of percussion instruments are kettle, snare and bass? Drums
  44. The terms ‘crease’, ‘wicket’ and ‘stumped’ are associated with which sport? Cricket
  45. What term describes a natural satellite orbiting a planet? Moon
  46. The eruption of Which Volcano destroyed the Roman city of Pompeii in 79 AD? Vesuvius
  47. Which two clay puppets were created by the Oscar-winning animator Nick Park? Wallace and Gromit
  48. What London-based, English Premiership soccer team plays its home games in the Emirates Stadium? Arsenal
  49. Weighing over a hundred tonnes and now on the Endangered Species List, what is the largest animal ever to have lived? The blue whale
  50. Which classic adventure story, where the hero is helped survive by ‘Man Friday’, was written by the author Daniel Defoe? Robinson Crusoe
  51. How many counties are in the province of Munster? Six
  52. Niall Horan from Westmeath is a member of which chart-topping Boy Band? One Direction
  53. Ancient Egyptians used a picture writing system. What was it called? Hieroglyphics
  54. Ulan Bator is the capital city of which Asian country? Mongolia
  55. What is the name given to a glove with two sections, one for the thumb and the other for all four fingers? Mittens
  56. Composed from the two Greek words ‘deinos’ and ‘sauros’, the word dinosaur means what in English? Terrible lizard
  57. How many players are there on a baseball team? Nine
  58. What is the name given to a group of lions? Pride
  59. Which European country celebrates the fourteenth of July, as a public holiday for Bastille Day? France
  60. In what country would you find Mount Elbrus, the highest mountain in Europe? Russia
  61. The Italian craftsman Antonio Stradivari, also known as ‘Stradivarius’, is famous for making what type of musical instrument? Violin
  62. In which north-western state of America is the active volcano Mount Saint Helens? Washington State

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About the author:

Emer McLysaght

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