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Dublin: 10 °C Tuesday 19 February, 2019
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The Weird Wide Web: the week in online oddities

The internet’s best offerings in social media, tech, science and weird news.

WELCOME TO THE Weird Wide Web – where we take a look at some of the internet’s best offerings in social media, tech, science and weird news.

Art.sy

New online market Art.sy aims to do the same thing for art that Pandora did for music by becoming a source of discovery and education. Its aim to help people discover new art is not without some controversy, with questions being raised about  the criteria and selection for suggestions – as well as some criticism over the fact that it pays galleries, rather than artists – still, it’s well worth a look…

Visitors discuss Van Dongen’s La Damme du Chien, 1920s, at a pre-auction show organized by Sotheby’s in Moscow, Russia. (Photo: Misha Japaridze/AP/Press Association Images)

Away game

Have you ever wondered what your favourite literary character would leave as their online away message? Then you are - surprisingly - in luck, because BRB Books exists.

Image: Sam72 via Shutterstock.com

Social media and development

Social media is helping teenagers’ development and giving them a sense of belonging and identity, according to a new study by the University of Washington’s Information School. The new type of peer-to-peer interaction happening on Facebook and Twitter is also helping quieter adolescents, who might be very shy, to reach out to own people their age.

However, the study also raises concerns about whether this new way of communicating was harming young people’s “autonomous sense of self”.

Image: scyther5 via Shutterstock.com

An other study has shown how Facebook is an increasingly social space, with 25 per cent of people aged between 18 and 25 now ‘friends’ with their boss on the social networking site. The survey by security company AVG also revealed that 60 per cent of Facebook users of that age group who are friends with colleagues do not restrict any content from them, Mashable.com reports.

Pet-Proto

If you like robots like we like robots, you’ll like this…


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