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Dublin: 4 °C Tuesday 12 November, 2019
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12 distinctly Irish ways to describe your hangover

A lexicon of Irish words for the terrible, near-fatal consequences of going on the lash.

JUST LIKE THE Eskimos were rumoured to have a hundred words for snow, Irish people have about a billion words to describe their hangovers.

Read on, if you’re feeling well enough. Take it easy now. Don’t strain yourself.

“I’m in Lego”

Cos you’re in bits. Geddit?!

Source: FlackJacket2010

The horrors

Ah, the horrors. You don’t want to be in there.

Source: Watchcaddy

“I feel like boiled shite”

Evocative, no?

Source: *Fatemeh*

Sick as a small hospital

A serious matter so.

Source: Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)

“I’m puking my ring”

Best not to think about the etymology of this phrase too long.

Source: Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)

Bottle of ghosts

Literary, but effective.

Source: james.rintamaki

“I’ve had a bad pint”

Yeah, yeah. Tell it to the judge.

Source: star5112

Brown bottle flu

The best of all euphemisms.

Source: brennan.v

“I’m in a heap”

You are yeah.

Source: Scott89

Mouth like a fur boot

Like a piece of old carpet. 500mls of Lucozade, stat.

Source: splityarn

“I’ve got The Fear”

The purest form of existential angst known to man.

Source: Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)

In rag order

Ah make us a cup of tea, would you?

Source: sanberdoo

What’s your favourite way to describe a hangover? Let us know in the comments. And feel free to share this if you just can’t even summon up enough energy to describe the pain you’re in. We feel you.

Read: The Guide To Curing Your Hangover>

Read: 9 foods you firmly believe will cure a hangover>

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About the author:

Fiona Hyde

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