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Dublin: 3 °C Saturday 14 December, 2019
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9 things you really miss about your childhood library trips

Before tablets, audiobooks and browsing.

1. Choosing your books

Before the internet the most browsing you did was along book shelves. The library held endless tales to explore.

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Source: O'Brien Press

2. Graduating onto the Young Adult section

Leaving the kids’ books behind and moving onto the higher shelves was a very grown-up moment.

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3. Library cards and tickets

Before computerised systems each library member had their own card envelope, and each book had a ticket.

Watching the librarian go through the ritual of checking out the books was a joy in itself.

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4. Seeing how many times your book had been checked out

The date stamps could go back years.

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5. The stamp

Hands up who coveted one to bring home?

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6. Sitting on the floor

More room for page-turning.

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7. Finding notes/names/dates/bookmarks  inside books

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8. The toys and the tiny tables and chairs

Source: Sherburne Memorial Library

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9. Setting up your own library at home

It’s okay if you still think being a librarian is a dream job. We do too.

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Read: Here’s why Judy Blume is a legend>

More: 13 of the hardest things about being a book lover>

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About the author:

Emer McLysaght

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