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Graham Norton asked Little Mix to sing Wings in Japanese last night, and they did

Well, now.

IT’S ALWAYS A little dicey asking a band to sing a capella, but when the suggestion involves a request to do it in Japanese, all bets are off.

lm Source: YouTube

Last night, Graham Norton told Little Mix that he had heard that their popularity in Japan meant that the foursome were now capable of singing in Japanese, so naturally he wanted proof.

And they were more than willing to provide it.

Sitting alongside Jason Momoa, Darcey Bussell and Bill Bailey, the group gave the audience ‘a blast’ of Wings, and as far as anyone on set was concerned, it was sang in Japanese.

Unsurprisingly however, social media reaction has been mixed, with some native Japanese speakers casting doubt over the girls’ command of the language and others commending them for their attempts.

“It’s really nice that they want to please their fans and I respect that and all but as a native Japanese speaker I couldn’t understand a single word they said,” wrote one YouTube commentator.

“Native Japanese speaker here and I can tell you that I understand what they are singing,” wrote another, in contrast.

At the start, it took a few times watching to understand what they are singing (mostly cos I have hearing problems tbh…) but as the song continued on, it was able to be fully understood and easily. ANY native speaker can hear it.

We’ll be honest, we’re not quite sure whether they did the language justice or not. But as for that harmonising? Nailed it.

If you missed it last night, take a look at this.

Source: The Graham Norton Show/YouTube

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About the author:

Niamh McClelland

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