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Dublin: 7 °C Friday 21 February, 2020
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There's literally a river full of whiskey in Scotland

7,000 bottles worth to be precise.

Image: Flickr

SCOTLAND IS KNOWN for its fine malt whiskey but did you know there was a whole river full of the stuff?

A whole river of liquid gold, just flowing freely through the Scottish countryside.

Imagine that?

Of course it’s not natural. The River Ayr – which generally consists of water – became laced with the spirit thanks to a bit of a costly accident at a local bottling plant.

STV News reports that Glen Catrine Bonded Warehouse Limited managed to pump around 5,000 litres of ‘whisky’ (they drop the ‘e’ outside Ireland) into the river when accidentally transferring 27,500 litres of the stuff from a road tanker into the wrong vat.

The error landed the company in a spot of hot water with the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency, who took them to court for failing to have sufficient measures in place to avoid such an incident.

Where’s Father Jack when you need him, eh? He’d have sorted that out in no time.

Source: DailyEdge

The Scotsman says the company was fined £12,000 for allowing the equivalent of 7,140 bottles of 67 per cent strength whiskey spirit to make its way into the water.

It’s unclear whether or not the spillage had any effect on local wildlife, but there’s plenty of speculation about the fate of the river’s fish online.

And it’s not all bad news either. The bottling plant’s error has actually inspired some eager beavers to get fit and healthy.

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